Back to the classics: Meyer lemon madeleines

Posted on May 16, 2013 by Mandy

Meyer lemon madeleinesIf you manage to get hold of a bag of Meyer lemons, you will know how precious they are. That is why I fully utilise these lemons inside out and top to bottom. While making the Meyer lemon cream, I needed to use an extra lemon for the juice. Before I juiced the fruit, I saved the zest and kept it in the freezer for later use.

If you are wondering what we can do with the zest of one lemon, there is a lot that can be done. The zest of a citrus has a more intense flavour as compared to the juice. Unlike the Eureka or Lisbon lemons we commonly get from the supermarket, Meyer lemon has a floral fragrance that lingers and gives bakes a vibrant and refreshing flavour. With my lemon zest in the freezer, I decided to go back to the classics and make some Meyer lemon madeleines.

I always feel that madeleines are one of those under-rated bakes. Bakeries and cafés are often stocked with cookies, cakes and muffins – to see madeleines in the offering is a rare sight indeed. The great news is that making madeleines is really very easy. No hard-to-find ingredient or special technique required –  the only thing I would say that would be super helpful is a madeleine pan*. The pan gives madeleines their distinctive shelled shaped underbelly and the bumpy hump.

This particular recipe that I am sharing really allows the Meyer lemon to shine, giving the madeleines that intense lemony flavour which helps to cut through the richness of this petite sponge cake. The bonus of this recipe is that you are required to make the batter the night before. This also means that in the morning, you get this beautiful cake for breakfast, and I am definitely not one who will reject cakes for breakfast.

About Mandy Ng

Mandy’s journey into the culinary world began out of necessity–a means of survival whilst she was at university. She believes cooking should be simple and fun. Besides spending time in the kitchen whipping up hearty meals, Mandy also dreams of having a bottomless stomach that she can fill with all kinds of delicious things.

What Others Are Saying

  1. Jace May 31, 2013 at 3:04 pm

    Hi Mandy, please share how you store the zest without affecting its flavour. I too hate the idea of throwing away the yummilicious zest of any citrus fruit but trouble is, I always thought that zesting should be done ala minute and cannot be stored away. I’ve tried peeling them in larger segments but these are useless in recipes that call for finely grated zest. So now I resort to storing the used lemon halves in the freezer until I need to use them. If you have a better idea, I would love to learn about it!

  2. Mandy June 2, 2013 at 1:55 pm

    Hi Jace

    What I do is zest the citrus fruit and keep the zest in the freezer. One neat trick is I portion the zest accordingly. Lay a piece of cling wrap, zest a single lemon/ orange, bundle it and place it in a zip lock bag. Store it in the freezer and use when needed. And continue the same with the rest of the fruits. I like individual portions as sometimes recipes call for zest of one lemon and you do not need to defrost a container of zest, measure and re-freeze the rest.

    What we want from the zest of the fruit is the “oil” in the skin hence freezing the zest is the best solution without losing flavour.

    • Jace June 18, 2013 at 2:39 pm

      Hi Mandy, I’ve done that before and I find that the flavour does deteriorate and the zest kinda dries out. Hence, my solution was to store the used halves. Maybe it’s a storage problem or I’ve stored the grated zest for too long. I’ll give it a try again. Thanks!

  3. val October 20, 2013 at 11:19 pm

    Hi, may i know where do i find meyer lemons? Or is it possible to use the normal kind of lemons found in ntuc or cold storage? If so, I should increase the amount of zest used right?

  4. Mandy October 28, 2013 at 12:20 am

    Hi Val

    Meyer lemons are seasonal produces which are available from Dec to May. Supermarkets like Cold Storage should stock Meyer lemons. You can use normal lemons and you will only need zest of 1 lemon as per recipe (there is no need to increase the amount of zest). What is unique about Meyer lemon is their zest is more floral with a hint of orange. Hence if you want, you can add in a bit of orange zest too. Let me know how your madeleines turn out!

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