Family Food: Buttermilk Pancakes

Posted on April 8, 2013 by S

buttermilk pancakes

Fluffy and tasty even on their own, these are our house pancakes. I’d even pack a whisk into my suitcase just to be able to serve these buttermilk pancakes when we’re travelling.  They’re that easy to make. And they’re that good!

I was initially drawn to this recipe because there’s no sugar in the pancakes (I was obsessed with omitting sugar from my toddler’s diet; if your family prefers something sweeter, check out Dawn’s fab recipes for peanut butter pancakes and cottage cheese pancakes). However, two additional details make this recipe extra special. Buttermilk gives the pancakes an appealing tang and complexity of flavour. And folding in the egg whites gives them a natural fluffy airiness (which is further sustained by baking powder). I always have a stash of these buttermilk pancakes in the freezer because T frequently gets up in the morning asking to have them for breakfast. In a pinch, he gets them with a drizzle of maple syrup. Otherwise, they’re topped with homemade blueberry sauce or bananas sautéed in butter.

 

About Su-Lyn Tan

Su-Lyn is Aun's better half and for many years, the secret Editor behind this blog known to readers simply as S. Su-Lyn is an obsessive cook and critical eater whose two favourite pastimes are spending time with her son and spending time in the kitchen. She looks forward to combining the two in the years to come.

What Others Are Saying

  1. Chenyze April 8, 2013 at 10:41 pm

    Wow, this must be the first time I’ve come across a recipe that not only tells you how to measure (dip and sweep), but also where you can conserve utensils to minimise washing. Thanks! (=

    • S April 15, 2013 at 4:07 pm

      Dear Chenyze
      Haha :) Most American baking books will tell you if they’ve used the dip and sweep as a standard measuring technique. But it’s usually hidden in the introduction or at the back of the book, which most readers often skip. I particularly love Rose Levy Beranbaum’s books because she is extra specific throughout her recipes.

      Of course, the beauty of blogging is that I can add more quirky details such has instructions for minimising washing. I use these recipes myself (it’s so much easier to search for them online), so the notes are also there to remind me to be efficient :) I hope you find the time to try making these pancakes.

  2. Joanne April 13, 2013 at 12:20 am

    hello! this recipe looks amazing!! question though.. i’m always under the impression that cake flour is not good because its gone through a lot of chemical processes to become cake flour. is this true? also, instead of using cake flour, can i use regular flour?

    • S April 15, 2013 at 4:01 pm

      Hi Joanne
      I’m not an expert on nutrition and hesitate to judge whether cake flour is more bad for you than all-purpose flour. I just enjoy everything in moderation :). However, if you search on the internet, there are lots of recipes for using all-purpose plus some cornstarch as a handy substitute for cake flour. I haven’t tried it out myself, but you might want to try that option if you prefer not to use cake flour.

  3. Sandra April 29, 2013 at 5:01 pm

    Seriously fluffy pancakes. I subbed in 50% wholemeal pastry flour for still very good results.

    • S April 29, 2013 at 5:13 pm

      Dear Sandra

      Cool! Thanks for the tip :)

  4. Busy mum May 4, 2013 at 10:24 am

    Hi S
    Thanks for another wonderful recipe.
    Made this twice and my kids had a ball of a time cutting out shapes from e pancake.
    Btw what non stick cookware do u use? Can u share which brand?
    I have been looking for a healthy choice, non Teflon one but still could not decide between Silit, Berndes, Greenpan. Your advice would be greatly appreciated.

    • S May 5, 2013 at 9:06 pm

      Hi Busy mum,
      I’m so glad your children had fun with the pancakes.

      I need to take a lesson from you on the non-stick cookware front as I am not as attuned to the research on it. I use Safico Pro and I am conscientious about replacing the pans once the surface shows any wear and tear. We also use a wide variety of just stainless steel, cast iron or enamel lined cast iron. The non-stick fry pan is specifically for pan-frying that doesn’t call for extreme high heat.

  5. Valere November 25, 2013 at 8:30 pm

    Can i replace the cream of tartar with baking soda?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


9 − six =

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>